Not Safe For Work, has become a ubiquitous phrase online, but beyond simply porn and violence what is Not Safe For Work. Our work and personal lives are becoming ever more entangled, and with companies able to take a closer look at our private lives where does that line end.

Cupola's exhibition NSFW exhibited artworks that, in some instances, have already caused trouble for the artists or have been censored by social media platforms or are simply topics about which employers and others might object. There are also more light hearted responses to the subject, but which most definitely would not be safe for, or at, work!

Amongst the eleven artists selected to take part in this exhibition, several deal with identity and sexuality using photographs, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. One artist has created artwork around mapping mental health, another is exhibiting a small deeply personal installation piece around politics, war and family. Another artist has made work around computer 'glitches' and another has delivered us dance steps guidance and instructions which would definitely be unsafe at work!

“What holds all these diverse works together is their connection with the deeply personal and often private aspects of ourselves. I find it fascinating that these very human feelings and experiences are too often censored and hidden away due to a perceived negative impact they may have on others or on a working environment. We spend on average 1/3 of our lives at work and the idea that the impact of our working life is now being extended into prying on and into our social activity is deeply worrying. Often it is only through sharing honest and personal thoughts, feelings and experience that deep connections can be formed. At a time when online personalities can be constructed and managed, fragmented and compartmentalised, how much of our 'real' selves is safe for work?”  

Karen Sherwood, director.

© 2018 Diogo Duarte | Privacy Policy

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